Malala and the ‘Educated’

Saleha Irfan, a young student from a private school in Lahore reflects upon ‘educated’ reactions to her counterpart from Swat 

malalapainting

When I first heard of Malala, I was in New Delhi for a competition with a few classmates, representing our school. As with many other incidents, we generally did not think much of it, maybe because events such as these are bound to fade into obsolete news articles with statistics and names of places that we do not even consider to be part of Pakistan, really, unless we need cover photos of places like Swat or Nanga Parbat or any other picturesque location, representing the ‘true beauty’ of our country. When I went back home, it was then that pictures upon pictures and articles discussing her bravery and resilience, along with news of her recovery were always on the front page. “Finally,” I thought, “people agree on something!”

But as the months went by, her story became more and more murky

But as the months went by, her story became more and more murky. Either people did not want to talk about her because she had ‘tarnished the image of the country’ by showing everyone that girls really do get shot for wanting an education or they continued to point towards her links with the BBC and how she would never have gotten this much attention had she been injured or killed in a drone strike. This was a ‘drama’ propagated by the West to ensure drone strikes continue because apparently it is completely normal to be willing to get shot in the head for such a cause.

The internet is a vast and wonderful place, but it is also an endless cave of opinions, some of which can be downright horrifying

The internet is a vast and wonderful place, but it is also an endless cave of opinions, some of which can be downright horrifying. As with the elections and other such events, I love reading comments on different forums because that is the easiest way for me to find out what people are thinking about such issues instead of relying on the television which seems to subtly manipulate what is said and what isn’t. And I was not disappointed. Searching the terms “Malala” and “drama” on Twitter will yield very favorable results if you are ever arguing for the steady prevalence of sexism, ridiculous conspiracy theories, an extreme presence of hatred for the USA and a dearth of common sense that exists in society. I am not saying that this specifically pertains to our society but it definitely made me reconsider the existence of logic amongst many people.

“I support PTI because their party colours are the same as that of Gucci”

I am tired of people complaining on my newsfeed about how all of this leads back to a lack of education because it obviously does not. When I have people on my newsfeed comparing her to Edhi and talking about how overrated she is, I feel an extreme sense of frustration and then an urge to laugh and publicly humiliate them, although that would not really help either of us. The fever surrounding the elections had already numbed me. When one sees statuses such as, “I support PTI because the party colors are the same as that of Gucci” and unleashing torrents of hatred towards each other especially pertaining to the Saad Rafique case, what can one do? Arguing seems futile, even if one presents proper evidence in the form of facts and figures, people will choose to believe what they want to believe. I am the “angry feminist” girl for debating against the four-witness rape justification and I am also “too liberal” when it comes to supporting Malala.

The misconception that we are somehow superior beings because we go to “elite” schools and thus have a better way of thinking is absurd.

The misconception that we are somehow superior beings because we go to “elite” schools and thus have a better way of thinking is absurd. There are still parents who will curse at Malala for the things she has supposedly done. There are still teachers that will talk about Jewish lobbyists. And there will always be a person on Facebook who will share a quote by anyone from Marylin Monroe to Sir Syed Ahmad Khan, which will either have not been said by them or will be completely irrelevant to the topic at hand. Before we move on to complaining about laptop schemes or how people vote for the PPP because of the Benazir Bhuto Income Support Fund, maybe we should try reevaluating our own thoughts, practicing some empathy and thinking before we speak. Malala forgave the Taliban.

Comments
One Response to “Malala and the ‘Educated’”
  1. Fulan Kishwar says:

    Education is good because knowledge is good. Knowledge is light. But if we leave it up to the “First World”, the education that they will make compulsory will be the one that limits the minds of children to just the physical and material world… it does not allow them the freedom to encompass the worlds beyond the physical, precisely those worlds that give meaning and purpose to life, that make the concepts of truth, goodness, and beauty to be objective realities and not just subjective notions that are relative and arbitrary. Malala is young, and one can only hope that her Western benefactors will allow her to gain a true education that includes the metaphysical and ethical aspects of reality. Perhaps then she can have a better understanding of how the enterprise of education has become a tool in the hands of the secular-liberal Empire, mainly for the purposes of indoctrination and for the benefit of their economic hegemony.

Leave A Comment

Please type the characters of this captcha image in the input box

Please type the characters of this captcha image in the input box

Calendar

August 2017
M T W T F S S
« Jul    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031  

Archives